Why People With Disabilities Want Bans On Plastic Straws To Be More Flexible

 
 
As cities and companies — including Starbucks — move to oust straws in a bid to reduce pollution, people with disabilities say they’re losing access to a necessary, lifesaving tool.
— The Salt, NPR
 [Image description: A closeup image of colorful flexible straws. Thn Rocn Khosit Rath Phachr Sukh /EyeEm via Getty Images]
 

Excerpt: It was a hot day at the zoo when Jordan Carlson's son, who has motor-planning delays, got thirsty. "We went to the snack bar and found out they had a 'no straw' policy," Carlson says. "It was a hot day and he couldn't drink."

Their only option was to leave the park and look for a business that sold drinks with a straw. Without one, her son can't drink beverages. At home they use reusable straws and she tries to keep some on hand when they leave the house, but "I'm human and sometimes I forget," Carlson explains. People with disabilities have to be much more conscious of what businesses and communities offer, Carlson says.

 
 

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