Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing

 Image description: Book cover for Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing by Marie Hicks. The background image is of a woman sitting at an early computer keyboard. The woman is wearing a long-sleeved print blouse, thigh-length skirt, and heeled boots. 

Author: Marie Hicks

Publisher: The MIT Press (paperback edition)

List price: $20

Summary: In 1944, Britain led the world in electronic computing. By 1974, the British computer industry was all but extinct. What happened in the intervening thirty years holds lessons for all postindustrial superpowers. As Britain struggled to use technology to retain its global power, the nation's inability to manage its technical labor force hobbled its transition into the information age. In Programmed Inequality, Marie Hicks explores the story of labor feminization and gendered technocracy that undercut British efforts to computerize. That failure sprang from the government's systematic neglect of its largest trained technical workforce, simply because they were women.